shakib:

Sending my love and respect to the people of Boston. A city that I love.
Shakib

shakib:

Sending my love and respect to the people of Boston. A city that I love.

Shakib

aplacetolovedogs:

omg

aplacetolovedogs:

omg

(via penguinsweaters)

Happy Places - there are some places and moments that I’ve experienced where I feel really peaceful and happy. These are some of them.

Wildflowers in the Grand Tetons

A walk in the woods in Amherst

Outside my apartment in Amherst on a spring day, the fire hydrant was spraying

Sagebrush in the Tetons

Walking my dog, Queenie, in a field near my house in VT

A field where I rode my bike in Amherst

Outside my house in VT during a sunshower

An early morning hike from a cabin where I spent the night in Barnard, VT

Arthur is the JAM

(Source: outofcontextarthur, via thisisnotyourhomework)

meredithvieiralives:

U-Mass Basketball Player Derrick Gordon on becoming the first openly gay NCAA basketball player, and staying true to himself no matter what.

(via fuckyeaumass)

nprbooks:

Image: Brittney Griner puts up a shot against Japan during a 2013 preseason WNBA game in Phoenix. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
At 23, Brittney Griner is one of the best female basketball players in the world. She came out as a lesbian while playing at Baylor University, and today she brings a defiant gender nonconformity to the court and to the culture that surrounds it. But she wasn’t always so sure of herself. She tells NPR’s Neda Ulaby:  

"Growing up, I always got ‘She’s a man,’ or ‘She plays too hard,’ or ‘There’s just no way that she can be that good because, you know, a girl can’t do that.’ And I struggle with it a little bit. I’m like: Well, am I going too hard? And then I just realized, like, I’m a competitor. I want to go as hard as I can, and if I look like a guy out there playing ball, well, hey, I feel sorry for the opponent."

Griner’s memoir, In My Skin, is out this week. You can read (or listen to) Neda’s profile of her here.

nprbooks:

Image: Brittney Griner puts up a shot against Japan during a 2013 preseason WNBA game in Phoenix. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

At 23, Brittney Griner is one of the best female basketball players in the world. She came out as a lesbian while playing at Baylor University, and today she brings a defiant gender nonconformity to the court and to the culture that surrounds it. But she wasn’t always so sure of herself. She tells NPR’s Neda Ulaby:  

"Growing up, I always got ‘She’s a man,’ or ‘She plays too hard,’ or ‘There’s just no way that she can be that good because, you know, a girl can’t do that.’ And I struggle with it a little bit. I’m like: Well, am I going too hard? And then I just realized, like, I’m a competitor. I want to go as hard as I can, and if I look like a guy out there playing ball, well, hey, I feel sorry for the opponent."

Griner’s memoir, In My Skin, is out this week. You can read (or listen to) Neda’s profile of her here.

I love this little guy

humansofnewyork:

"One day a crazy looking homeless guy came to the door, and we were about to close the door on him, but my mother saw him and shouted: ‘Hey Eugene!’ She knew his name! Then she ran around the kitchen putting all sorts of food into tupperware, and brought it out to him. After he left, we asked my mom why she gave him so much food. She told us: ‘You never know how Jesus is going to look when he shows up.’ She was always saying that— it was a spiritual thing. Then you know what happened? Two months later, that same man showed up on the door step, clean shaven, and wearing a suit. And he had an envelope with money for my mother. ‘Ms. Rosa always believed in me,’ he said. I’ll never forget it! Eugene was his name."

humansofnewyork:

"One day a crazy looking homeless guy came to the door, and we were about to close the door on him, but my mother saw him and shouted: ‘Hey Eugene!’ She knew his name! Then she ran around the kitchen putting all sorts of food into tupperware, and brought it out to him. After he left, we asked my mom why she gave him so much food. She told us: ‘You never know how Jesus is going to look when he shows up.’ She was always saying that— it was a spiritual thing. Then you know what happened? Two months later, that same man showed up on the door step, clean shaven, and wearing a suit. And he had an envelope with money for my mother. ‘Ms. Rosa always believed in me,’ he said. I’ll never forget it! Eugene was his name."

jtotheizzoe:

larstheyeti:

stars

Pretty much.

jtotheizzoe:

larstheyeti:

stars

Pretty much.

shadyfriend:

today my nephew (who’s recently decided that he’s a wizard) came round and showed me his book of spells (a folded a4 piece of paper) - i looked at it expecting to see spells to turn people into frogs and to make you fly etc but the only thing he’d written was a spell to make people smile
and i think he must be a wizard because i smiled pretty big

(via wehavedonetheimpossible)